Posts Tagged ‘ibmeventstreams’

Processing Apache Avro-serialized messages from Kafka using IBM App Connect Enterprise

Monday, May 13th, 2024

IBM App Connect Enterprise (ACE) is a broker for developing and hosting high-throughput, high-scale integrations between a large number of applications and systems, including Apache Kafka.

In this post, I’ll describe how to use App Connect Enterprise to process Kafka messages that were serialized using Apache Avro schemas.

screenshot

This is an update to an earlier version of this post, reflecting updates to the sample code.

Background

Best practice when using Apache Kafka is to define Apache Avro schemas with a definition of the structure of your Kafka messages, and to store those schemas in a central registry that client applications can access at runtime.

If you want to use IBM App Connect Enterprise to develop and host integrations for processing those Kafka messages, you need App Connect to know how to:

  • retrieve the Avro schemas it needs using schema registry REST APIs
  • use the schemas to turn the binary stream of bytes on your Kafka topics into structured objects that ACE can manipulate and process

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to migrate to a new cluster

Thursday, April 18th, 2024

This is the sixth in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters.

For this sixth post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to migrate your Kafka cluster to a new region.

I’ve broken this down into multiple stages. For each stage, I’ll explain the intent and share a demo script I’ve created to let you try this for yourself.

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to restore from a backup cluster

Friday, April 12th, 2024

This is the fifth in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters.

For this fifth post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to maintain a backup of your Kafka events, and to be able to restore from that backup.

This is more complex than the previous posts as there are multiple stages involved. For each stage, I’ll explain the intent and share the demo script I’ve created to let you try this for yourself.

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to create a failover cluster

Monday, April 8th, 2024

This is the fourth in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters.

For this fourth post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to create an active/passive topology with a backup cluster ready to failover to.

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to share topics across multiple regions

Friday, April 5th, 2024

This is the third in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters, but sometimes I feel like this can be forgotten if we only talk about it in the context of disaster recovery.

In these posts, I want to inspire you to think about other ways you could use Mirror Maker 2. The best way to learn about what is possible is to play with it for yourself, so with these posts I’ll include a script to create a demonstration of the scenario.

For this third post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to create logical topics shared across multiple regions.

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to broadcast events to multiple regions

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2024

This is the second in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters, but sometimes I feel like this can be forgotten if we only talk about it in the context of disaster recovery.

In these posts, I want to inspire you to think about other ways you could use Mirror Maker 2. The best way to learn about what is possible is to play with it for yourself, so with these posts I’ll include a script to create a demonstration of the scenario.

For this second post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to broadcast events to clusters in multiple regions.

Where the last post described a “fan in” scenario, this is effectively the opposite use case: a “fan out” scenario.

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Using Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams to aggregate events across regions

Saturday, March 30th, 2024

This is the first in a series of blog posts sharing examples of ways to use Mirror Maker 2 with IBM Event Streams.

Mirror Maker 2 is a powerful and flexible tool for moving Kafka events between Kafka clusters, but sometimes I feel like this can be forgotten if we only talk about it in the context of disaster recovery.

In these posts, I want to inspire you to think about other ways you could use Mirror Maker 2. The best way to learn about what is possible is to play with it for yourself, so with these posts I’ll include a script to create a demonstration of the scenario.

For this first post, I’ll look at using Mirror Maker to aggregate events across clusters in multiple regions.

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Getting demo events onto IBM Event Streams topics in a hurry

Wednesday, March 13th, 2024

Sharing a couple of tips for quick-and-dirty demo setups.

I often need to put together demos of IBM Event Automation without much notice. The starting point is almost always needing to get a bunch of interesting events onto a Kafka topic.

What I need is a jumping-off point to illustrate the benefit of sharing streams of events in Event Endpoint Management, or the types of processing you can do in Event Processing. And to do that, I need a topic with events on them that will look interesting or relevant to who I’m demo’ing to.

If I’ve got time to do this properly, I’ll setup a generator that will give me a continuous stream of randonly-generated events (example). But if I’m in a hurry, I’ll use the REST Producer API and do something like this instead.

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